Category Archives: All Neon Signs News & Events

Red Cross Month: Show Your Support

March is Red Cross Month, an opportunity to show our thanks for an organization that does so much to make the world a better place. There are very few organizations whose reach is as broad, whose mission is as generous and whose commitment is as complete as the Red Cross. When people throughout the world need help, the Red Cross is there.

AmericanRedCross

History of the Red Cross

Today’s Red Cross is made up of a number of different institutions, some of which operate independently from one another. They can all trace their roots to the same place, though. Until the middle of the 19th century, there was no well-organized method for providing medical care to wounded soldiers and civilians who were affected by war.

That began to change in the 1860s. A group of well-connected businessmen from throughout Europe met to discuss the feasibility of an international aid organization. After much planning and logistical discussion, they established the “International Committee for Relief to the Wounded.” Just a few years later, this committee would draft the first Geneva Convention establishing humanitarian rules for war.

The organization grew in membership, resources and influence, and they first adopted the “Red Cross” title in 1876. Five years later, the first chapter of the American Red Cross was established by Clara Braton. Throughout both World Wars, and every major international conflict, the Red Cross has redoubled their commitment to provide care and support to those who need it most.

Current Red Cross Initiatives

  • Disaster Relief – The Red Cross sends relief to around 70,000 disasters each year in the United States alone.
  • Supporting Military Families – The Red Cross helps around 150,000 military families and veterans prepare for service and reintegrate into society when they return home.
  • Blood Donations – More than 40% of America’s blood supply comes from the 4 million blood donations made through the Red Cross every year.
  • Health and Safety Services – More than 9 million American annually participate in Red Cross programs, learning CRP, lifeguard training and occupational safety.
  • International Services – Over 13 million volunteers work in 187 countries around the world responding to disasters, supporting communities and training future humanitarians.

How You Can Support the Red Cross this March

There are lots of ways you can support the Red Cross this month. Consider donating a portion of your proceeds to the organization. Encourage your customers to donate, or to purchase products that support the Red Cross’ humanitarian mission. You can even choose to partner with the Red Cross to organize a blood drive or collection.

No matter what you do, make sure that everyone knows about it. Use your neon or LED signage to point out that March is about the Red Cross, and, if possible, display the iconic logo. Advertise any events or special celebrations you have planned, and use your signs to draw in everyone that passes by your business. The Red Cross does not have an easy job, but with your support and the support of your customers, they can do more good for more people.

 

Image Source: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GF1997RedCross.jpg

Original Source: http://blog.allneonsigns.com/all-neon-signs-news-events/red-cross-month-show-support/

Women’s History Month: Honoring Female Inventors

March is Women’s History Month, a time to honor the valuable contributions that women have made to politics, history, art, culture and science. If you run a small business, this is a holiday worth celebrating all month long. At least half, and possibly a majority, of your customers are women, and women’s history is a proud tradition that anyone can support.

If your business relies on neon or LED signs, think about using them to highlight the celebration and the achievements of women. Sometimes, the most valuable message you can put on your signage has nothing to do with products, sales or hours. Joining in the celebration of Women’s History Month illustrates to everyone that passes by your business that you care about the integral role women have played in this country and beyond.

Simply pointing out that March is Women’s History Month is a great start. From there, use your signage to celebrate individual women, especially inventors. Some of the most important items we use in day-to-day life were invented by women, but too few people know about them. These are a few examples to get you started.

Hedy_LamarrHedy Lamarr

In addition to being one of the most popular actresses of her generation, Hedy Lamarr was an accomplished inventor. During WWII, Lamarr helped to develop a wireless communications technology for transmitting classified information. Aspects of this technology are now used in everything from Wi-Fi to cell phones.

Patsy ShermanPatsy_Sherman

Patsy Sherman was already a pioneer when she joined 3M in the early ’50s and became one of the few women working in the R&D department. She distinguished herself even further by inventing “Scotchguard” stain repellant, a product that is still widely used today.

Bette Nesmith Graham

Some inventions are so helpful, and so ubiquitous, that it is hard to imagine a time when they did not exist. When Bette Nesmith Graham invented “Liquid Paper” in 1958, she changed the way that people went about clerical work. Open up the drawers in any desk, and you are likely to find a bottle of “Liquid Paper.”

Mary Anderson

Before Mary Anderson, driving in rain, snow or inclement weather was next to impossible. That all changed when she invented the first set of windshield wiper blades in 1903. This simple solution to a common problem changed the way that people thought about automobiles, and the blades we use today follow essentially the same principles that Anderson pioneered.

This list barely scratches the surface of notable inventors. Think about the products and services that are most important to your customers, and do a little research to find out what role women inventors played in their development. As long as you are respectful and excited, there is no wrong way to celebrate Women’s History Month. Before we get any further into the month, configure your signage to offer a message of celebration.

 

Image Sources: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hedy_Lamarr-publicity.JPG; en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Patsy_Sherman.jpg

Original Source: http://blog.allneonsigns.com/all-neon-signs-news-events/womens-history-month-honoring-female-inventors

Merry Christmas From All Neon Signs

lit_christmas_treeAll of us here at All Neon Signs would like to wish you and yours a very Merry Christmas. At this special time of year, we hope that you can take some time off of work to spend with your friends and family. No matter what your Christmas traditions are, take this opportunity to relax, reflect and soak up the magic of the season.

We take Christmas very seriously here in our office. Our business is producing lights, and there is a strong link between the Christmas season and light. The meaning of the season seems to be encapsulated in the warm glow of bright lights on a cold winter’s evening. That is one of the reasons that so many Christmas decorations are illuminated.

The tradition dates back to 18th century Germany. Before tinsel, strings of twinkling lights and ornaments of every type, people would decorate their Christmas trees with candles. The candles would be fixed to the tree branches using melted wax or pins. Almost 100 years later, they began using candle holders, and the link between Christmas and light was solidified.

Electric Christmas tree lights did not become popular until electric power became widespread, but the first ones appeared in 1882. Edward H. Johnson, an associate of Thomas Edison, had 80 custom made incandescent light bulbs built specifically for his Christmas tree. At the time the decoration was seen as a publicity stunt, but beginning at the turn of the century, businesses started to incorporate electric lights into their Christmas displays. The first electrically lit Christmas tree to brighten the White House came in 1895. The iconic Rockefeller Christmas tree was first adorned with lights in 1931.

The use of electric Christmas lights spread quickly, but it was not until the 1950s that they became standard in many American homes. The tradition has only grown since then. Christmas lights migrated from the tree to banisters, mantels and eventually the outside of houses. Now, many neighborhoods have coordinated lighting displays, or hold competitions to see who can turn their home into a festive winter wonderland. Wherever you go around Christmas, you can see lights of every shape, size and color lighting up the night, sometimes modestly and sometimes spectacularly.

At All Neon Signs, we can’t help but love this illuminated time of year. Around our office and warehouse, we have put up bright signs in the shape of Christmas trees, snowflakes and reindeer. Even at work, the Christmas spirit is infectious.

It is our sincere hope that the stress of the holiday season has melted away so that you can enjoy a great meal, the exchange of thoughtful gifts, rounds of Christmas caroling, glasses of eggnog, the joy of children, and the too-rare opportunity to gather the entire family. Merry Christmas from the entire team at All Neon Signs. We hope that your holiday season is filled with light.

 

Image Source: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Piazza_Portanova_Natale_2008.jpg

Original Source: http://blog.allneonsigns.com/all-neon-signs-news-events/merry-christmas-neon-signs

Thanksgiving in America: A Holiday for All

Thanksgiving is unique among American holidays. Unlike most other major celebrations, it has no religious or political connection. It is simply a time for people to gather together, enjoy a great meal, and think about the things they are thankful for. Thanksgiving is a holiday no matter where you came from or what faith you subscribe to.

thanksgiving-mealHistory of Thanksgiving
Historians disagree about the exact date of the first Thanksgiving. It is unlikely that the Puritans of the 17th century ever dined on turkey and potatoes with the local Indians, but the celebration is almost as old as the country itself. In 1795, President George Washington made an official proclamation setting aside February 19th as “a day of public thanksgiving and prayer.” At the time, and for many years after, Thanksgiving was celebrated in a religious context as a time to give thanks for the blessings of God.

In 1863, with the Civil War raging, Abraham Lincoln made another proclamation about Thanksgiving. He set the date as the last Thursday in November, the day it is still observed on today. Before this, Thanksgiving was celebrated on a different day in every state, but President Lincoln made it into an official national holiday.

Thanksgiving Meals
For some Thanksgiving remains a religious holiday, but for many it is simply a time to come together and enjoy a great meal. Turkey and stuffing are the traditional dishes, but some people prefer to break with tradition. Immigrant families often use Thanksgiving as an occasion to cook their favorite dishes from their native lands. Some families allow each member to pick a favorite food, from macaroni and cheese to pizza, and serve them all as a feast. There are Thanksgiving meals based around fish, soup or vegan dishes. The point is simply to cook foods that everyone enjoys as a reminder of life’s good fortune.

Thanksgiving Traditions
Watching or playing football are common Thanksgiving traditions, but most families have their own traditions that they come back to year after year. Some spend the morning of Thanksgiving going for a family hike or running a 5K. Many families have a favorite movie that they always watch after everyone is stuffed from the meal. In one unusual instance, a family saves all of the bones from the turkey and tries to reassemble the skeleton as a kind of jigsaw puzzle. After these traditions are repeated over and over, they become as essential to the holiday as the favorite foods.

Thanksgiving in the Military
Military families understand better than most that Thanksgiving is not about the food or the yearly rituals, but simply being together with each other. It is not easy for any family when one of its members is deployed, but it is always harder around the holidays. Thanksgiving, being such a fundamentally American holiday, would not be possible were it not for the sacrifice made by the brave men and women in the military. You have a lot to be thankful for, but this Thanksgiving, be sure to keep military families in your thoughts and be grateful for the sacrifice they make for us all.

 

Image Source: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Happy_Thanksgiving_%284138758719%29.jpg

Original Source: http://blog.allneonsigns.com/all-neon-signs-news-events/thanksgiving-america-holiday/